Friday, June 1, 2018

Here’s a Tip: Consider the Resolution



Photographers share a common goal: using light composition to capture moments and creates emotions in viewers. The most iconic photographs  ̶  from the struggles depicted in Dorthea Lange’s moving images of the Great Depression to the jubilant kiss between a sailor and a nurse in Alfred Eisenstaedt’s “V-J Day in Times Square” – all stir up something in anyone who sees them.
 
If you’ve shot an evocative image it’s natural to want a wide audience for it. So, new photographers can be tempted to enlarge the photo to make it stand out.
 
But larger isn’t always better. In fact, it can be worse. The final quality of an image has a lot to do with its resolution, or the number of pixels comprising it. If the resolution of an image isn’t high enough, enlarging it can obscure it, causing a blurry effect.

 So how can you tell if your image resolution is high enough? American Frame Printing Services Supervisor Tom Peters has an easy-to-use formula.


 
“The number of pixels in your image divided by the size you want to print in inches equals the required resolution of your image, in PPI, or pixels per inch,” Tom said.

We recommend images have a minimum resolution of 130 PPI at print size.
 
For help finding the amount of pixels in your image, read this blog post by our expert framer Mike Cromly.
 
Here are some other things to keep in mind.
 
Take High-Resolution Images.

Adjust your camera settings to take the largest pixel dimensions it can at the highest quality it can. It’s easier to size down a high-resolution image than to blow up a low-resolution image.
When in Doubt, Order a Proof.

You don’t have to imagine what the final product will look like at a certain size. We offer color or resolution proofs on any paper for a flat fee of $7.50 a proof.


Have more questions? Browse our How-To section or call our framing experts. They’re happy to help.

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